UFO Contemplation

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

UFOs and String Theory

stringtheory.jpg

UFOs have more of a reality than “strings” – the basic elements (building blocks) of existence according to some physicists.

Lee Smolin, in his book “The Trouble with Physics” [Houghton Mifflin, 2006], argues against the obsession that most physicists, academic researchers, and scientific facilities have with string theory.

(Wikipedia provides a succinct overview of the discursive theory at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_theory for those who aren’t familiar with the concept.)

The problem with string theory is that no one can confirm by tests or experimentation the existence of strings, a dilemma similar to that for UFOs.

There is a difference however, and it’s this: UFOs have a tangibility, a record of being there (or here), whereas strings have no record – nada, nil, zilch.

Yes, UFOs exist and have existed for some recorded time. What they are remains a mystery. Those who “study” them – so-called ufologists – have botched the scrutiny of the enigma by ineptness and hubris (traits that also apply to many physicists if we read Smolin correctly).

UFOs , as a mythology and a reality, are dissipating as a major concern, for the militaries of the world, governments, or the public at large, because they’ve been spotted and photographed (perhaps) but have yet to show any profound malevolence or any practical worth as a phenomenon (except to UFO mavens who remain gaga by the idea of UFOs).

String theory may or may not be bogus. UFOs are not bogus, but they aren’t part and parcel of anyone’s life, unless persons have made them so (which is a sad commentary on the purposeless existentialism of some folks).

String theory is fun to contemplate. UFOs also. But that’s all either of the concepts are.