UFO Conjecture(s)

Monday, October 06, 2008

The Roswell clue that everyone overlooks

roswell22.jpg

Kenneth Arnold’s June 24th 1947 sighting of nine objects near Mount Rainer spurred media to take Arnold’s description of the objects' movement – like a saucer skimmed over water (which itself was a strange way to describe aeronautical movement) – eventually coining the term “flying saucer.” But the term “flying saucer” wasn’t in common use until well after June 24th, 1947.

Strange flying objects seen in the period just before the (in)famous Roswell incident of July 1947, just two weeks after Arnold’s sighting, were described, almost invariably, as disks or discs.

(See NICAP http://www.nicap.org/waves/1947fullrep.htm but disregard Ted Bloecher’s and Ed Ruppelt’s anachronistic use of “flying saucers” or “UFOs” in the NICAP rundown, as those terms are wrongfully inserted backward into the flying disk history.)

Even most accounts of the Roswell episode referred to a “flying disk.”

flyingdisk.gif

And even an FBI memo referred to a “flying disk.”

The alleged William Blanchard/Walter Haut press release had described the recovery of a crashed “flying disk” but the newspaper account – in the July 8th edition of The Roswell Daily Record -- referred, in its headline (above), to a captured “flying saucer” [sic].

Further, the newspaper account went on to report the following:

“The intelligence office of the 509th Bombardment group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into possession of a flying saucer…

Major Marcel and a detail from his department went to the ranch and recovered the disk, it was stated…

The intelligence office stated that no details of the saucer's construction or its appearance had been revealed.”

The question to ask is this: Why did the newspaper and Jesse Marcel, as quoted, use the term “flying saucer”?

The term wasn’t indigenous, as we’ve noted, to media or the common parlance.

It may have been, however, part of the military argot, but Jesse Marcel and/or the newspaper wouldn’t know that.

Therefore, Marcel use of term could only have came from sources privy to the military jargon, and he passed the term on, in his quotes, to the newspaper.

This means that someone, high up in the military establishment who communicated with Major Marcel used the term, because it applied to what was recovered in one or two places near Roswell that July.

Flying saucer was the newly minted term for flying objects that the military had deemed material and real, and possibly extraterrestrial.

And the crashed disk(s) near Roswell fit the description.

1 Comments:

  • "Lenticular Planform" was the way one government report tried to scientifically describe the flying saucer shape. Carl Jung wondered if it may be an "archetype" or symbol of the subconscious mind -- as if the very shape of our galaxy (or cosmos) is hard-wired into our DNA. It seems that the secret of gravitation is still waiting to be discovered, once we fully recognize that the structure of space-time or unified field as Einstein said is a flattened spheroid. If only everyone could be sealed in the forehead!

    - Peter Kapnistos

    By Blogger AwareWare, at Monday, October 06, 2008  

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