The UFO Iconoclast(s)

Saturday, March 03, 2012

Physicists stumped!


Physicists are as stumped about their subject matter as "ufologists" are about their subject matter.

But which is more important -- the galaxies (in this story) or UFOs?

Click HERE to read about the latest cosmological puzzle.

Middletown, New York UFOs in the late 1970s


PM Maagzine was a sloppy TV news magazine extant in the 1970s/1980s.

This video, which we uploaded to YouTube, however, allows examples of witness responses to UFO sightings, and how photography, at the time, was flummoxed by UFOs (apparently).

Note two things:

1) The UFOs beamed lights (like those Anthony Bragalia concentrated on in the 1966 Wanaque reservoir sightings) -- something not noted or happening during current UFO sightings.

2) The clothes and hair stylings of the people in the video. (Gosh, the 70s were replete with goofy hair and awful garb!)

Click HERE to view the video -- it's nothing exeptional though.

RR

Friday, March 02, 2012

Jesse Marcel Sr. on Roswell

We've uploaded a snippet from "In Search Of" (Leonard Nimoy's show from the 1980s) to YouTube.

This video contains Jesse Marcel Sr. telling his story about what happened at Roswell -- the debris gathering, and the aftermath, from his perspective.

The video opens with a note about how the Roswell incident began, and Peter Gersten appears, briefly, to tell of a document that shows the FBI's intrusion into the Roswell affair.

Click HERE for Jesse Marcel's first-hand account, unmolested by a UFO interviewer.

RR

Thursday, March 01, 2012

Two UFO tales for your evisceration, from….

Copyright 2012, InterAmerica, Inc.


True Flying Saucers & UFO Quarterly [No. 4, Winter 1977], paraphrased, in part.

From Page 27:

…in the town of Gilroy, southeast of San Francisco, 19 year-old housewife Terry Smith and her 12-year old cousin, Imelea Lugo, were driving to Imelea’s home (about 11 p.m.).

“Suddenly out of nowhere…a large flying object swooped down ahead of their car, hovered…about 50 feet above the road, then began to bob up and down.”

They jumped from the car and ran and ran (about fifty yards) to the Lugo home, where they woke up Imelea’s parents, taking them outside.

Forty-five-year-old Jose Lugo, an auto parts salesman, and his wife tell what they saw:

“…About 100 feet above the house was this strange circular object with blinking red, blue and white lights flashing around a middle section. It was grayish colored, much bigger than an automobile, and had three legs for landing gears. The bottom of each landing gear had something resembling the rubber suction cup on a bathroom plunger.”

Mrs. Lugo added, “It just hung there in mid-air, so low I could see two window-like openings on top…the reflected lights from the UFO gave it a ‘gem-like quality.’

From Page 51 comes this account from Rivesville, West Virginia (also paraphrased in part):

A member of the author’s [Jennings H. Frederick] family, on April 23rd, 1965, had a strange encounter “with a saucer and what was apparently an 'alien being'.”

"Susan” saw, out her kitchen window, what she took for a child, perhaps on the way to school or a small person who “appeared to have been thrown into a pasture at the top of the hill."

Susan thought that maybe someone had run into an electric cattle fence that ran through the area.

She ran out of the house, and from her front porch, yelled, asking if anyone was hurt and needed help.

But instead of a reply, she was startled to see a saucer-shaped craft come down and land (near the little being? – the author doesn’t make this clear).

“Extending from the small ‘being,’ who…appeared to be three or four week tall, was a black cable…which [was] connected to the craft.”

Susan estimated the saucer to be about 5 to 10 feet long [!] and 5 feet in height.

The “being” was black or very dark green and looked more animal than human, “For it had a tail, about two feet long!”

The alien being had V-shaped ears – this was pre-Spock, 1965 remember – or rather ears that came to a point.

No mouth or eyes were seen and it looked to be humanoid [sic] in general features – one head, two legs, two arms.

“Susan didn’t try to communicate with this being but, instead, ran back into the house and locked the door.”

Looking out the window, she saw “the being collecting samples of grass, soil, etc.” (The “etc.” isn’t defined) –“and placing same in a pouch of some sort. He wore no helmet, and moved in a very jerky, or stiff, restrained manner.”

The craft was described as cream and silver colored, “with rows of small windows atop an upper deck. There was also a dome or crystal canopy on the upper surface which sparkled in the morning sun.”

“…the craft rotated in a clockwise direction…emitting a humming, or vibrating, buzzing sound.”

Susan saw the alien step aboard the craft, which rose rapidly, straight up, disappearing out of sight.

The author went to the alleged landing site and writes that he found tracks and soil indentations, some hair samples around footprints, which had four toes and a sharp heel.

He surmised that the craft was 25 feet in diameter and weighed more than a ton.
-------------------------------------------------
Now I ask you, what are we to make of such UFO tales?

Which one rings truer? Or do they both ring true? Or do they seem far-fetched and false?

The first account is a “typical” UFO sighting; the second is a Distortion-like account that Jose Caravaca’s theory might address.

But what do we get from either account?

Similarities to other UFO reports abound:

The three landing legs in the Gilroy account, the windows, and the blinking red, white, and blue lights.

In the West Virginia encounter, we find soil and grass samples being gathered by a strange-looking being who, purportedly, came from a saucer-like craft, moving like a robot, tethered to the craft, leaving remnants of his (or its) visit.

Are we to dismiss such stories?

Are they more important than sightings of anomalous craft flying in the skies, faster than a speeding bullet?

Do such tales help us in our search for an explanation of the UFO phenomenon (or phenomena)?

Are such witness accounts grist for sociological or psychological scrutiny?

Or are such events mere footnotes to human experience?

RR

How UFO photos are hoaxed and why UFO aficionados accept them


This is a short (truncated) clip from a NOVA presentation (early 1980s) about hoaxed UFO photos, with attention on the British Warminster sighting(s).

How easily UFO "experts" are fooled and why UFO mavens believe hoaxed photos are authentic:

Click HERE for edification...

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Jose Caravaca supplements material in the posting previous to this (below)...

Copyright 2012, InterAmerica, Inc.

In my posting (below this one) about UFOs being treated shabbily, I note a brief aside in an article by Clark and Farish [UFO Reports, 1975]; an encounter that was, they admit, "most interesting" with which I concur.

Noted Spanish UFO researcher, Jose Antonio Caravaca, saw my mention and has been kind enough to provide more details:

The case is from 1925, and based on an anonymous letter, received by the researcher Antonio Ribera in 1968. (No investigation was conducted.)

We only have the testimony of an anonymous informant.

The letter was sent from the town of Quero (Toledo, Castilla La Mancha). Information obtained from the book "ENCUENTROS CON HUMANOIDES" Antonio Ribera 1982.

book1.jpg

Textual content of the letter:

"Sir, informed of your interest in collecting data about flying saucers and aliens, I am writing to you to let you know a fact, not a dream.

It occurred to me over 40 years ago.

Somewhere in La Mancha [sic], very close to a church building, suddenly I found myself with a very strange being.

Its height was approximately 1.20 meters, clothing, like a green uniform.

His arms and legs were stiff and stuck to the body.

In his hands he held a blower circle of about 20 cm in diameter, flexible, with a pinging sound.

His legs and feet rigid, united to an axis, which by turning a small wheel, he “walked” in my direction, driven by the effects of the blower which he carried in his hands.


being1.jpg

I watched at a distance of 2 meters, for a short time.

We looked at each other, but did not come to speak. I hope you forgive my anonymity."


There is no more information. Only a letter which begins, like Don Quijote..."somewhere in La Mancha."

Ballester Olmos, included the case in his catalog of 200 landings in Spain.

But he took it back for lack of more evidence or information as to the authenticity of the case.

Meanwhile Mr. Ribera, explains in his book that as bizarre and absurd as the event seems, it does appear to be credible, when taken into account with other stories of encounters...

There is no more documentation about the letter. Ribera, himself, was the first to write about the incident.

N.B. The "blower" is a hand tool used to fan the embers of a fireplace or charcoal. I do not know its name in English.

In the book by Ribera, the date is given as 1924, and in the book of Iker Jimenez, ENCUENTROS; EL ENIGMA OVNI [2000], it also appears as 1924.


Jose Antonio Caravaca/RR

UFOs treated shabbily...


Copyright 2012, InterAmerica, Inc.

The Fall 1975 issue of UFO Report [Volume 2, Number 5] contained an article by George Eberhart [Flying Saucers over the Arctic, Page 34 ff.] from which this excerpt comes:

Click HERE for an enlarged, readable image

It’s an interesting item, but has no provenance or anthropological credibility and has been sitting, unnoticed in the magazine for thirty-six years.

Why?

(Nick Redfern has promised us a piece about hairy dwarves and UFOs, so maybe we’ll get more about these little people, in the arctic wastelands, from him)

UFO compiler Jerry Clark – we don’t consider Mr. Clark a UFO historian, although he and others try to apply that epithet to him; he has never employed historical methodology to his sighting lists, only presenting a litany of sightings with no historical exegesis – and the late Lucius Farish had an article [Unsolved Mysteries from UFO archives – Part VII, UFOs of the Roaring ‘20s, Page 48 ff.] which had this brief paragraph:

“By far the most interesting report of 1925 occurred in La Mancha, Castilla, Spain. Unfortunately we have few details, only this short account from ‘Survey of Iberic Landings’ in DataNet Report, March 1971.

A man suddenly met a strange being, 1.20 m. [approximately four feet tall], wearing a greenish uniform. The entity had rigid arms and legs, held a disc in his hands, and was propelled by another disc on which he was standing. The witness observed it from a distance of 2 m. [six-and-a-half feet]. No word was exchanged.”
[Page 60]

(Perhaps Jose Caravaca, an authentic UFO researcher, might be able to find out more about this intriguing, little encounter. I’ll ask him.)

These examples tell us why UFOs have been dismissed by science, academia, and media: they are teasers, without journalistic substance or referential detail.

Clark is old now, and left with a legacy that some of see as wanting. His compilations have never taken us into hypothetical or theoristic territory. He just gives us icing on the cakes, but no cakes.

UFO Reports, like other UFO magazines merely titillated. They didn’t satisfy, least of all those who need substance and credible sources for the so-called information imparted.

Kevin Randle tells, in his latest book, how he slipped articles into such magazines, on the fly, for a few bucks, without having to do any real digging for facts or details that might edify.

The UFO topic has been ill-served by the “writers” of such dreck.

And that’s why UFOs are the scourge of almost anyone with a sense of scholarship and/or journalistic acumen.

RR

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

UFOs and Quantum Computing


These are excerpts from an IBM press release about the company’s research into quantum computing:

Quantum computing relies on the contents of quantum bits — qubits, or qbits —existing in many different states at once, with the correct answer to a question coming from the way multiple qubits interact while in multiple states. If a qubit interacts with its surroundings in a non-reversible way — a process called decoherence — the quantum calculation stops, and thus effective quantum computing relies on maintaining coherence for long enough to be useful. Moreover, quantum computing is a statistical process and reliant on error detection and correction for accuracy.

In addition, the researchers carried out experiments with a 3D supercomputing qubit, in which the qubit maintained its quantum state up to 100 microseconds. "This value reaches just past the minimum threshold to enable effective error correction schemes and suggests that scientists can begin to focus on broader engineering aspects for scalability," IBM said.

Qubits could allow a quantum computer to perform millions of computations at a time, IBM said, and a single 250-qubit state would have more information bits than there are particles in the universe.

Now, compare that to what transpires during those UFO encounters I love and Jose Caravaca delineates, or what was said, by Betty Hill, to have taken place during her alleged abduction and examination -- mental and physical.

The entities disembarking from strange craft do not know, unless they have telepathic powers (a possibility), who they are confronting.

Their behavior is geared to rubes and those without exceptional mental abilities.

One would expect advanced galactic visitors to provide some “conversation” or indications of technology along the lines of, or even more advanced, than what has been reported: grunts, gathering of water or soil samples with mundane tools, and Neanderthalian-like behavior.

Even if witnesses are experiencing robots, those artificial life-forms are primitive too, compared to what Japanese technicians have created with their robotic forays.

Thus, we might conclude that the encountered entities and their craft are distortions of a prosaic, old-fashioned technology, derived in part from the mental configurations of the witnesses, as outlined by señor Caravaca’s imaginative and brilliant Distortion hypothesis.

If anything futuristic, like iBM’s quantum computing, was found at Roswell or Aztec, it remains unknown to us who were not in on the discovery or retrieval(s).

That leaves the maneuvers of those futuristic craft that our friend Dominick alluded to in comments for a previous post here.

Do the flight characteristics of some UFOs indicate technological advances in space travel that, without a spec sheet, gives us clues to visiting members of a civilization from elsewhere in the Universe (or from another dimension or time)?

The lack of “advanced” technology in those encounters I favor keep me tethered to a neurological or psychological explanation for them, or an acceptance of Jose Caravaca’s theory.

And I can accept that some craft or objects and lights seen in the skies and sometimes tracked may be vehicles of an advanced extraterrestrial race or, perhaps, just prototypes by Earthians that have yet to be made public.

Whatever UFOs are, they have not displayed anything like what is projected by IBM in its quantum computing research.

And that diminishes UFOs for me.

They have to be something less than one would wish, don’t they?

RR

Monday, February 27, 2012

Our Rational Skeptics: Lance Moody, CDA, and Gilles Fernandez


Lance Moody is getting more and more irritated with the irrational ravings of UFO mavens — ET believers and others.

CDA is almost livid because Roswell enthusiasts keep coming up far short when it comes to providing evidence that something crashed near Roswell, and left debris, or maybe some alien bodies as many Roswellian devotees have it.

Gilles Fernandez sees Roswell as a mythical tale, built from a 1947 happening that was vague when it occurred but taking on a life by the efforts of some UFO researchers who want that happening to be an extraterrestrial event.

I love these guys!

They are skeptics, in the best sense of the word, exasperated by the nonsense and lack of anything tangible when it comes to Roswell, and UFOs, generally.

UFOs – unidentified things in the sky – are real. Many of us have seen such anomalistic things.

But to take a step toward flying saucer creatures entering the Earth’s atmosphere to explain those unidentified things is irrationality made substantive.

I’m enamored of so-called creature encounters; that is, accounts of beings seen near some kind of craft, but only from a psychological perspective.

Like Roswell, there has never been anything tangible collected from such encounters or sightings: nothing at all, ever.

The encounters have all the earmarks of a dream, and Spanish UFO researcher Jose Antonio Caravaca has made an excellent case for such events being oneiric, or dream oriented.

People have seen lights and strange objects in the skies, surely, and they are not all crazy or delusional.

But lights and apparent flying constructs are far from an alien reality.

My close encounter accounts are open to scrutiny from a number of disciplines, with a number of possible explanations, all suitable to the rational mind.

And Roswell? Yes, something happened near there in 1947 -- something prosaic or something profound. No one really knows what and may never know, as Nick Redfern has it.

The fact is that nothing – absolutely nothing -- has surfaced to provide concrete evidence for an extraterrestrial crash of a flying disk near Roswell in 1947.

And that’s why our skeptics get so annoyed with those who insist otherwise.

Lance, CDA, Gilles, et al. allow me to see that some right-thinking still exists within the parameters of a topic that is flush with ignorance, faith-based belief, and mental chicanery.

So huzzah to the skeptics amongst us here. They are cherished by some….even many.

RR

Travis Walton's 20/20 Interview (circa 1979)

Travis Walton has become visible again.

A 20/20 interview with him, in the late 1970s or early 1980s, that we've uploaded to YouTube, shows him to be "authentic" -- his description of how he reacted when he awoke in the craft that allegedly abducted him and saw three beings rings true.

However, we are always curious as to how persons not skilled in estimating sizes of anything always manage to provide dimensions of the UFOs they see with a certitude that rivals technicians with skills at determining sizes of things seen; Walton does this early in the interview.

Dr. Michael Persinger, a cognitive neuroscience researcher, thinks Walton's experience was induced by electromagnetic anomalies along the fault lines in the area where Mr. Walton says he was abducted.

A brief segment includes a sighting in New Zealand, that was adduced to have occurred because of fault line activity.

I think Bruce Maccabee made much of the New Zealand sighting, without resorting to the fault line theory.

The fault line hypothesis is a stretch, of course.

Our video was derived from an aging VHS tape and is glitchy but watchable

Click HERE to access the YouTube upload.

RR

Sunday, February 26, 2012

UFOs: Tom Snyder interviews J. Allen Hynek and Peter Gersten


We have hundreds of taped [VHS] TV shows about UFOs, from 1976 forward.

We had uploaded many to YouTube about seven years ago but those videos were eliminated.

We're now uploading a few, again, and this one with Tom Snyder interviewing J. Allen Hynek and attorney Peter Gersten, from the early 1980s, provides some intriguing information about UFO sightings and the U.S. government cover-up(s) of the sightings, even after FOIA disclosures. Peter Gersten provides details.

J. Allen Hynek tells Snyder what researchers needed to do to ultimately explain the UFO phenomenon but all these years later his astute advice is still being ignored.


The video ends abruptly after about fifteen minutes from, I think, YouTube's previous limit on video timing.

Click HERE for the video.

RR