UFO Conjecture(s)

Sunday, December 16, 2012

Psychochemically Induced UFO SIghtings

Copyright 2012, InterAmerica, Inc.

Several years ago we published information given to us by Bosco Nedelcovic, an AID/CIA officer who worked for the Department of Defense in South America.

The information imparted was that the 1957 Villas Boas case was actually a psychochemical experiment formulated by U.S. Army Intelligence and the C.I.A.

You can read about it at a blog of The Recluse:


Nick Redfern also provides a full chapter about this in his book, Contactees.

The December 17th, 2012 issue of The New Yorker has a lengthy article (18 pages) by Raffi Khatchadourian, Operation Delirium [Page 46 ff.] that corroborates, circumstantially, what Nedelcovic offered and Anthony Bragalia investigated earlier in blogs for us.

ny1217a.jpg

That various government agencies, provocated by the C.I.A., engaged in psychochemical experiments, on volunteers and an unsuspecting public, is no secret.

The New Yorker article cites a 1949 report by L. Wilson Greene, Psychochemical Warfare: A New Concept of War

The idea that psychochemicals could disable or derange America’s Cold War enemies became an idée fixe of the military and clandestine agencies of the U.S. government, and The New Yorker piece documents the machinations, using the confessional remembrances of Colonel James S. Ketchum, who was in the Army from 1956 to 1976, working at various facilities such as the Edgewood Arsenal and Dugway (which Anthony Bragalia has written about, as has Nick Redfern).

The chemicals exploited included EA3834, a variation on BZ, LSD, PCP, in such Projects as Dork [sic] .

The British Ministry of Defense, admittedly, engaged in similar experimentation and testing.

The article supplements theories or hypotheses that indicate come UFO sightings and encounters were the result of covert operations that targeted members of the public.

The sightings that I see as possible products of such possible interventions include the Hill “abduction,” the Travis Walton kidnapping, The Hickson/Parker Pascagoula event, the Cash-Landrum affair, some of the French, Italian, and British encounters (reported by Jose Caravaca for us), and dozens of others.

While I’ve listed some of these UFO events under the rubric of hallucinations, that psychotic-like manifestation would surely be the end result of psychochemical influence, as The New Yorker article articulates.

For those who don’t find an ET explanation satisfactory for some UFO episodes the New Yorker piece will lead you to a conclusion of government foolery which created, inadvertently or not, UFO events, like the Villas Boas case, where chemically induced psychoses made for scenarios that ufologists, wrongfully, think are part of an extraterrestrial invasion.

RR