UFO Conjecture(s)

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Saturn's moonTitan: One of those places that is the home of the saucer people?

A place that may house life, aside from the Earth:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/29/saturn-moon-titan-shell-interior_n_3836092.html

RR

4 Comments:

  • It turns out we're probably all Martians anyway:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/scientists-reveal-life-on-earth-may-have-begun-on-mars-8788844.html

    By Blogger Paul Kimball, at Thursday, August 29, 2013  

  • Rich:

    Whenever I've thought about what makes an object or phenomenon "interesting", it comes down to being about a 50-50 mix of the familiar and the unexpected. If everything about an object is entirely familiar, it contains no surprises, no new information, so it's boring. If everything about an object is entirely unknown, it is hard to intellectually engage.

    I think Titan is close to being that 50-50 mix. In some ways, it is Earth-like in that it has lakes, rivers, landforms, and weather. On the other hand, Methane takes the place of water in the hydrological cycle. The average surface temperature is only about 5 degrees above the point where the predominantly Nitrogen atmosphere would turn into liquid Nitrogen and pool up on the surface. Within that context, Methane (and similar short chain hydrocarbons) evaporates from the surface, rises up and forms clouds, which then precipitates out as Methane rain or snow. Liquid hydrocarbons on the surface form seasonal lakes and rivers with tributaries, which erode the surface material and carve surface features like canyons and playas, etc. Seasonal storm systems arise in the polar regions, during local winter. The equatorial region is "arid", mimicking the equatorial desert regions on Earth.

    The crust of Titan is rigid and floats on a viscous liquid core, mimicking plate tectonics on Earth. The energy for the tectonics comes from the tidal forces induced by being so close to the gas giant planet, Saturn, not from radioactive decay, as on Earth. Hoever, the temperature at a few kilometers depth is warm enough to create a mix of liquid water, methane, ammonia, and other primordial compounds that could, theoretically support life.

    A weird place, but recognizable as Earth's "shadow" (to use a Jungian term).

    By Blogger Larry, at Thursday, August 29, 2013  

  • Nice post Rich. UFO researchers would do well to follow your lead and stop calling for science to embrace UFOs, but rather UFO people should start getting more into this type of find and embrace science.

    Yeah, I've said this before.

    By Blogger Frank Stalter, at Thursday, August 29, 2013  

  • http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/30/martians-earth-aliens

    "The theory that microbes from Mars 'infected' the Earth via meteorites, finding conditions here more conducive to their evolution, is nothing new – but Prof Benner's theory, that the minerals essential to life's formation were only readily available on Mars, is. Such a notion challenges almost every aspect of human culture, from biology to philosophy and faith – and practically every science fiction scenario in the book."

    By Blogger Paul Kimball, at Friday, August 30, 2013  

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