UFO Conjecture(s)

Monday, April 29, 2013

The Flatwoods Monster: A Creation of the U.S. Air Force?

flatwoods2.jpg

Nick Redfern, in his book, Monster Files, which I reviewed earlier here (see posting below this one), takes up the Flatwoods Monster sighting of 1952 in Chapter 6 [Page 63 ff.].

Nick notes that, during World War II, a bizarre episode by the British, as recounted in a Rand Corporation 1950 document (The Exploitation of Superstitions for Purposes of Psychological Warfare), was provided by a Jean M. Hungerford that involved the British military building a 12 foot scarecrow-like robot to frighten the Italians fighting in Italy’s mountains.

The “scarecrow” – an imaginative creation of one Jasper Maskelyne -- supposedly emitted “frightful flashes and bangs” to scare the superstitious Italian soldiers who were allied with the Nazis, thus creating chaos and havoc on the lines.

(Yes, it’s a silly tale, and, on its face, one that stretches credulity.)

The United State Air Force, however seems to have taken the idea and elaborated upon it, as part of that agencies psy-operations, and built their own 12 foot creature and tested it out in Flatwoods, West Virginia in 1952.

Here are two links about that episode, for those who need a refresher course:



You can read about both convoluted affairs in Nick’s book. And see how Nick comes to the conclusion that the U.S. Air Force was responsible for the Flatwoods sighting, which had nothing to do with an alien visitation and a monster extraterrestrial but was only an elaborate psy-op of the U.S. military, one of many in the time-frame.

What’s your thinking on the matter?

RR 

Nick Redfern's latest: Monster Files

Our friend Nick Redfern’s new book is this one:
mfiles.jpg

Monster Files: A Look Inside Government Secrets and Classified Documents on Bizarre Creatures and Extraordinary Animals

Two hundred eighty-five pages of material culled from the inner sanctums of various government entities.

A spurt of Chapter headings shows pure Redfernian curiosity:

The President’s Bigfoot
A Wartime Wolfman
Weird and Wacky Winged Wonders of War
An Army of Manimals
A Yeti-Hunting 007
The Strange Saga of Acoustic Kitty
The Nessie Files
Sasquatch, UFOs , and the U.S. Air Force

Oh, and there is more, but you should get the book, especially if you’re a cryptozoological aficionado. I am not.

But I always find something valuable or interesting when I am lucky enough to get a Redfern book.

Nick doesn’t just hypothesize; he researches and investigates, thoroughly.

I can’t do justice to Nick’s work. His writings transcend the ordinary. And he excels at detail; detail that is relevant and pertinent.

He doesn’t just write to bulk up copy. He provides the goods.

For example, in Chapter 23, The Biggest Blooper of Them All, he reveals that The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with the U.S. Navy, monitored a strange “Bloop” during a routine 1997 sound tracking in he Pacific Ocean, off of South America.

The “bloop” lasted 60 seconds and its sonic frequencies seemed to indicate that a large living creature was roaming the waters.

In his recounting, Nick cites H. P. Lovecraft’s  Cthulhu mythos, Melville’s Moby Dick, and Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo.

(No literary slouch, that Redfern.)

In Chapter 15 [Sasquatch, UFOs, and the U.S. Air Force, Page 141 ff.] Nick offers what I consider to be various nightmare and psychotic accounts involving a “Steve Palmer,” Big Foot, and paranormal researcher Stan Gordon.

Palmer, in the Fall of 1973, at his Pennsylvania farm, spotted a huge luminous object and two large beasts with long arms and glowing green eyes that he shot at – to no effect – before the beasts scurried into the darkness, as the UFO disappeared.

 Researcher Gordon, alerted by a state trooper, met with Palmer, several hours later.

Gordon, Palmer, and some cohorts went to the site of the alleged encounter, where Palmer had, what I would call a fugue state: Palmer started breathing heavily and assumed an animalistic growl before throwing his own father and one of the accompanying fellows to the ground.

The other men started to feel sick, from a smell of rotten eggs or sulfur.

Palmer said that while he was in his altered state he encountered a black-robed figure, carrying a sickle, who warned that if humankind did not change its way, the world would come to an end.

A few weeks later, Palmer had two visitors – a man in a regular suit and one dressed as an Air Force officer.

They asked about that weird encounter, and showed him photos of Sasquatch-like entities, relating that such creatures were real as were UFOs.

Palmer agreed to be hypnotized, to provide more data, ostensibly, and when the session was over, the men left. Palmer never heard from them after that.

Nick’s pages have many such weird accounts.

Such stories will turn off the more rational among you – I find the account to be flush with psychological elements, or even neurological taint – but Nick’s readers will find such tales to be part of the paranormal world they think is as real as our prosaic world.

Yes, the material in Nick’s new book is far out – it’s the fringe at the edge if fringe.

But if you are inclined to find such stories interesting or possible, you’ll love Nick’s book.

The Paperback sells for $15.99 and can be found at online and offline booksellers.

You can also find out more about it at:


RR