UFO Conjecture(s)

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Captain Ed Ruppelt's Death

I received this in an e-mail March 1st, 2015:

"I don't know if you have any further interest in the death of Edward Ruppelt, but we were his neighbors at that time, and he car pooled with my husband to work at Northrup Aircraft.  He never missed work to my knowledge and rode to work with my husband as usual, on the day of his death of a "heart attack". You can verify this information by checking our addresses---we lived at 1951 Josie Avenue Long Beach California, and Ed and his wife Liz and two daughters lived at 1931 Josie Avenue.  The homes were built in 1953 and we moved into ours in October of that year. We did not socialize with the Ruppelts, other than the two men car pooling.  My husband finished his career at Northrup Ventura, and has since died. I'm sorry that I have no other information to give you, as my husband, and surely Ed also, had Q Clearance, and at least in my case, did not divulge anything critical.  I know that my husband (John McLean Robinson Jr.) was very sceptical about the story of Ed's death, as I am to this day.

Thank you for your time.
Gloria J."


6 Comments:

  • ...

    It's 'Northrop', not 'Northrup', and as a former Norcrafter I would doubt that anyone who's husband had worked there for decades would make that (common for outsiders) mistake.

    A check of ancestry.com shows Ruppelt lived at 1911 Josie Ave, not 1931, and worked for Northrop Hawthorne, not Ventura (the old Radioplane drone division, which would be one heck of a commute from Long Beach).

    The writer would have to be at least 95 years old... And yet very computer savvy.

    As usual, intriguing in that someone is taking the time to craft something with nearly authentic details but where does it lead (or just disinformation fodder?)

    By Blogger UFO DNA, at Monday, March 02, 2015  

  • "In 1956, Donald Keyhoe asked Ruppelt to join to serve as an adviser to NICAP. Ruppelt had recently suffered a heart attack, and declined Keyhoe’s offer."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_J._Ruppelt

    A heart condition in the 1950s often led to sudden death, not a conspiracy, just a fact.

    By Blogger Loki, at Monday, March 02, 2015  

  • UFO DNA wrote:
    It's 'Northrop', not 'Northrup', and as a former Norcrafter I would doubt that anyone who's husband had worked there for decades would make that (common for outsiders) mistake.

    A minor and common spelling mistake (I make it too), I consider to be in the nitpick category. Also for your 95-yearish women, is it so remarkable?

    A check of ancestry.com shows Ruppelt lived at 1911 Josie Ave, not 1931,

    Another pure nitpick. How accurate will you about the EXACT addresses of YOUR neighbors 50+ years later when you're 95ish? She was off by one digit. Big deal.

    You also failed to confirm the other address she gave, where they lived. A check of ancestry.com ALSO shows that a John M. Robinson and wife Gloria did indeed live at 1951 Josie Ave., Long Beach, at least from 1957-1962. They had lived in Long Beach since at least 1942. He was indeed listed as an engineer in the 1950s.

    and worked for Northrop Hawthorne, not Ventura (the old Radioplane drone division, which would be one heck of a commute from Long Beach).

    Now you just aren't reading carefully. The writer said her husband "FINISHED" his career At Northrop Venutura. Do you see anything where she says he worked there when they lived close to the Ruppelts?

    The writer would have to be at least 95 years old... And yet very computer savvy.

    How "computer savvy" does one have to be these days to write an email? Believe it or not, there are old people that age who are quite capable of doing it.

    As usual, intriguing in that someone is taking the time to craft something with nearly authentic details but where does it lead (or just disinformation fodder?)

    Except for two very minor mistakes, perfectly plausible given the passage of time and woman's advanced age, everything so far checks out. The writer doesn't make any big claims (so where does your "disinformation" come in here?), like Ruppelt told them of a government UFO coverup.

    All she says is that she and her husband were neighbors with Ruppelt, Ruppelt and her husband had high clearances and both kept their mouths shut about their work, they were both engineers working for Northrop, they both lived near Hawthorne Northrop at the time where they commuted together to work, and she and her husband were both a little suspicious of Ruppelt dieing so young of a heart attack.

    What I see is somebody flippantly dismissing even a minor story based on nitpicking, personal misreading, and very shallow research.

    By Blogger David Rudiak, at Monday, March 02, 2015  

  • Agree completely David. My 94 year old mother could email (she died at 97), What's far more interesting is why and how Ruppelt came to alter so dramatically his position on UFOs from "original edition" to "revised edition". Does anyone have any reasonable speculation on that?

    By Blogger Dominick, at Monday, March 02, 2015  

  • Yes, Dominick, the big question is why did Ruppelt add on three debunking chapters to his original book just before he died? I don't buy that he had a sudden change of heart (no pun intended). If you read Keyhoe, Ruppelt was in communication with him and still very much interested in the subject in the late 1950s.

    Ruppelt's 1956 book was a tattle-tale insider look at the USAF's involvement with the UFO topic, revealed some highly classified things that had never been publicly discussed before (such as the 1953 CIA Robertson Panel and 1947 Twining memo, though didn't give the names), and a number of other bombshells (like a CIA scientist telling him several days ahead of time in July 1952 that the big build up of UFO sightings in the past few months led them to expect the granddaddy of all sightings in either New York City or Washington D.C. Then followed the highly publicized radar/visual/jet intercept cases over Washington.)

    I (and others) wouldn't be at all surprised if he was pressured to backpedal some of it. People do have heart conditions at young ages and die of them, like Ruppelt. He probably wasn't murdered, but a high degree of stress might have led to his early demise.

    (As for your mother emailing in her 90s, good for her. My mother is now 99 and never showed the least bit of interest in computers or email. She used to be a helluva typist and banged out lengthy letters to the family, but nary one email. The point is, emailing something has only gotten easier the last 20 years since advent of the public Web and lots of old people use it. It doesn't take any more computer savy than knowing how to start up a computer, open an email program, know how to address it, and start typing)

    By Blogger David Rudiak, at Monday, March 02, 2015  

  • I believe Ruppelt got disenchanted with UFOs after the first edition of his book, due to the proliferation of contactee stories that were about in the mid to late 1950s. Also, a number of these were in southern California which was also host to various conventions on these tales. There is something about it in the revised edition of his book.

    Another useful source is the Wendy Connors- Michael Hall large paperback book on Ruppelt's life and career, published in 2000.

    No he was NOT murdered, of course. But it does not surprise me in the least that amongst the UFO community that exists now (and then) there will always be a few who think otherwise.

    One question I wish to put to anyone who knows the answer: did Ruppelt write the whole text himself, or did he have a ghost writer?

    By Blogger cda, at Sunday, March 08, 2015  

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