UFO Conjecture(s)

Monday, April 27, 2015

UFOs and Reality Bubbles

Coming in from the airport Sunday showed me that everyone has a project: various peoples working on their lawns, houses, farms, cars, and assorted other activities, such a playing with the kids or kids doing sports or just fooling around.

And then, today, I trod through the few UFO sites I visit and see that each person who’s created their site and their followers all exhibit a penchant for specificity about the UFO topic.

This made me think that each UFO sighting or report or event has created a reality, for the main person(s) involved and their followers: Ken Arnold, Adamski, Villas Boas, the Hills, Travis Walton, et al.

The same for those hypothesizing about UFOs: Friedman, Rudiak, the Slides guys, et al.

But as I noted the other day, here, those realities are bogus and slight; they occur within the mind of those cited, and nowhere else.

My closed reality is contained by my mind and consciousness and attempts to extrapolate that contained reality is often curtailed by interacting with others who wish for me to be sucked into their bubble reality.

I usually escape the attempts but find myself often enmeshed in various whirlpools of UFO “realities” – some of my choosing, some not.

The encapsulating reality that we all ignore, especially those of us enraptured by UFOs or “ufology,” is given short shrift.

The encapsulating reality is made up of a world-view where other things occur and intrude, some from the past but most currently happening.

There is much to behold and to ruminate about, and UFOs are a minor part, or should be, of that real reality.

I’m currently re-reading Harold Bloom’s book “Genius” and hoping to interact about it with academic Bryan Sentes, who is a obsessive fan of Emmanuel Kant, which I find a little distressing, Kant being flawed in many ways, to the point that Bloom doesn’t include him in his book and most, here at least, have no idea what Kant’s thoughts were, as profound as they were and are.

One of my chums is ingratiated by anything to do with the Jesus myth and that which created it.

He is so immersed in the topic that he’s created a reality bubble that doesn’t serve his daily existence.

Yes, the topic is fascinating, but so are many other things, more relevant to one’s life.

Oliver Sacks, who is dying of terminal cancer, wrote a piece in the current New Yorker about the monologue practitioner Spalding Gray who committed suicide after a neurological glitch caused by an auto accident.

UFOs is the farthest thing from Sacks’ mind (and certainly played no part in Mr. Gray’s life).

And the UFO “realities” mentioned above played and play no part in the lives of normal people.

But we few who cogitate of those realities, Roswell among them, are lost is a miasma of myth and nonsense that has drained us of a world-view.

We are adrift in a created bubble that bespeaks neuroses or, worse, psychoses, of a harmless kind (perhaps) but unreal at any rate.

I’m hoping that we can integrate UFOs into a seamless account of life, today, and the realities or reality that affronts us all.

Even writing that shows the idiocy of the attempt.

UFOs are a minuscule element of life and even if those damnable Kodachrome slides end up indicating an alien, extraterrestrial life-form end up here on Earth ins 1947, what does that have to do with reality, the reality we have to contend with and understand in order to live sensibly and thoughtfully?

Nothing, nothing at all.

RR

12 Comments:

  • But, Rich, Christianity itself was a "minuscule element of life" too at one point in its history, but look at what happened to its influence and effect on human (institutional ) development over several hundred years or so. The UFO phenomenon has only been around in the public consciousness for, say, 70 years and it is still at the "mystery" stage of development, i.e., in its infancy. If, and I underline if, we are dealing with an extra-terrisital phenomenon, it is way to early to write off its ultimate effect on our "reality." On the other hand, if we are able to explain UFOs in rather prosaic terms in the near future, I agree with you completely.

    By Blogger Dominick, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Dominick, you wrote: "Christianity itself was a "minuscule element of life" too at one point in its history, but look at what happened to its influence and effect on human (institutional ) development over several hundred years or so."

    I agree fully, although Christianity is a small part of reality, a flawed part, as I now see it, which my Jesuit teachers in seminary would be appalled to know.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • I completely agree that Christianity is, indeed, a flawed part of reality but disagree that it is "small." You must be kidding. Believers number in the billions world-wide and the belief structure (for better or worse) guides a substantial part of their every-day reality. And the political influence (in domestic politics here and in Middle Eastern foreign policy) is anything but small. Yet if UFOs prove to be as exotic as I think that they might be, that influence on "reality" in my view will be even greater. That's my conjecture at least.

    By Blogger Dominick, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Dominick:

    There are 8 billion people on the planet, and only a relatively small portion of them are Christians, but that said, the reality that is Christian is, in an objective sense, small; hat is, Christianity is a fluke that has inserted itself in human reality to the detriment of our species....let me count the ways.

    But it is, for some, their reality, their "bubble reality" or as Freud told us, an illusion, a wish-fulfillment, just as UFOs are (for many of us reading this).

    Few are looking for the real reality, the Platonic reality, outside the cave.

    My posting point, again, is that some in the UFO community are locked into this UFO reality or some other crazy reality, unable to extricate themselves from their psychological or neurological quirks, their false reality or realities.

    Christianity has been effective as a mover of our Western civilizations, more detrimentally that beneficially, but that's a whole other story.

    (Fortunately, UFOs haven't been as detrimental, harmless actually.)

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Rich,

    Yes, it's easy to dump on Christianity as a whole due to some of the unsavory history of it's leaders. We still drown in their selfishness and self-imposed worthless vanity.

    But, that does not mean that the message from an age long gone by should be deemed as worthless. The word, the Logos, was and still is that of hope against the same realities that you rage against.

    The teachings of Jesus, in its purest intent, was the methodology of formulating a moral compass to help navigate through whatever realities we may be faced with.

    I'm sure the same could be said of other religious movements that espoused some sort of enlightenment. And science can be construed as religious by its own nature.

    I see no means of establishing a moral compass with the study of UFOs.
    As you have aptly discussed on numerous occasions, UFOs, ETs or not, have had no effect on our daily lives...for better or not.

    I'll pass the basket down the aisles now...cash preferred over personal checks.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Tim:

    Michael Moorcock's Behold the Man is my template for Jesus.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Rich, LOL, you are so cynical, but Moorcock could well be spot own!

    Or there is a morsel of a crumb of truth to the Gospels and Acts with Paul co-opting the whole thing in the end leaving John stranded on Patmos raving revenge against Rome and it's future progenies.

    Or, it is all what has been handed down for the past 2000 years even with all the attempts to wreck the original story by either well intended scribes or outright misdirection by the same.

    I'm a big Bart Ehrman fan, love his textual critiques, but rather than toss in the Christianity towel as Ehrman, I've restructured my belief by looking at it in a different way.

    But I'm still giggling about Moorcock's description of Mary, Joseph and Jesus...again your template may well be right.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Tim:

    I'm an Ehrman fan too, despite his tendency to be narratively redundant.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Ehrman writes his books with the attempt to have broad appeal and not to offend the sensibilities of most.

    Its his published research work that has a different tone which tends to be dull for my taste, but that's academia to it's core, dull in my opinion.

    BTW, my favorite Ehrman take is on the Book of Job. I pictured God and Satan sitting around having a beer debating the righteousness of poor old Job. God telling Satan that he could do anything he wanted to Job except kill him.

    Anyway, thanks for allowing the diversion away from UFOs.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • For me, Tim...

    It's Jung's Answer to Job and the Shroud of Turin (yes!) that keep me thinking that maybe Jesus was God after all.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • Jung's showing of God's evil side, or the Trinity actually having a 4th defined element.

    I did a book review on my blog two years ago, "Jung's Mystic" by Gary Lachman.

    I wrote:

    "Jung appeared to morph over time from Protestant, Psychiatrist, Gnostic, Guru, etc. Lachman details Jung's struggles with these internal mental constructs as he attempted to hold on to the label of scientist while publicly denying the role of mystic. It appears that Jung may have been an empiricist in the beginning, but slowly drifted away towards the mystic...paranormal."

    Jung, similar to Freud is an enigma from a psychiatric point of view.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

  • There is, Tim, a troubling account of a Jungian dalliance with a (somewhat) patient (Sabina Spielrein) in a review of a book by John Launer, Sex Versus Survival in The April 10th, 2015 Times lIterary Supplement [Page 27].

    Jung had sexual relations with Ms. Spielrein who became a kind of notable in psychiatry herself, murdered, along with her children by the SS,in 1942.

    Jung, like Freud, was not a paragon of mental health or morality but still men of stature when it comes to psychological insight (and other insights).

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Monday, April 27, 2015  

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