UFO Conjecture(s)

Friday, May 22, 2015

The rage has subsided?

The loss of a Roswell “explanation” (those slides, of course) caused some in the UFO community to vent their spleen, in ways that haven’t been seen since the Alien Autopsy brouhaha.

Vituperation emerged from the id, much as that depicted in Forbidden Planet (from the Krell):
There is a residue of semi-psychotic rage, repressed usually, among members of the UFO community, but where does that repressed rage come from?

Only a psychoanalytic session can really tell us.

Yet, we often have to deal with it, in comments here and elsewhere in UFOland.

David Rudiak called for UFO-blog commenters to use their real names, to quit hiding behind nom de plumes, aliases, or alter egos.

I agree.

One can discern much from an avatar used by commenters online. But why should we have to?

Many show up at Kevin Randle’s blog and Isaac Koi’s AboveTopSecret site, and a few here, but this blog tries to stick with those who use their real names to make public pronouncements: CDA (whom we all know as long-time UFO enthusiast, Brit, Christopher Allen), Lance Moody, Bruce Duensing, Paul Kimball, Nick Redfern, David Rudiak (himself), Kevin (of course), Gilles Fernandez, Jose Caravaca, Zoam Chomsky (yes, we know who that really is – The Iron Skeptic!), and many others).

It’s the hidden-identity group that causes trouble – not so much those who use “handles” at AboveTopSecret, a usually benign group – but, rather, a slew of others who come forth upon UFO “conversations” to rattle cages and/or spew venom because of their suppressed (or repressed) rage.

I have a recent e-mail, from a guy who used to post here – it’s a prime example of psychotic rage (which I’ve shared with Lance Moody and Nick Redfern).

The fellow needs counseling, surely, but will not get it, as he thinks he’s normal and psychologically healthy. 

My position is to delete or ignore comments from the sick element, generally, or to call them out when they go too far with their expletives that indicate derangement.

But Mr. Rudiak’s suggestion – use your real name online – would go a long way to assuaging vitriol and id impulse commentary in UFO circles.

It’s not a cure-all but would help.

Now that the ire (about the May 5th thing) has diminished pretty much, maybe we can go forward with dialogue that makes “ufology” the fun, stupid thing is was always meant to be.

I hope so, anyway.

RR

13 Comments:

  • I recall during my psych clinicals (Saint Louis University) my instructor admonish me "...not to play with the schizophrenics." Yet, when 5 patients are self-proclaimed reincarnations of Jesus Christ, one must separate the wheat from the chaff and reveal the "impostors."

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • And, Tim, I noted a bit of sympatico by you for one bi-polar person from you in a recent comment, that comment lost because I deleted the post your comment addressed.

    In the UFO community there are categories of mental quirks and/or serious mental illnesses that you, I, and Gilles Fernandez, plus a few other persons can recognize easily.

    There is little wheat with these people, all chaff and one needs to avoid them, if one wants to provide a sensible blog or web-site.

    Kevin is catching on to this, thankfully, as are a few others.

    The slides farce brought forth many who can be seen to be off-kilter.

    We can't kill them, but we can make sure to try and suppress their ravings, mine included sometimes.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • Maybe the recent fiasco brought out a few more than usual but real loons have been around this topic since the Internet began.

    Even then "UFO" skeptics were asking, "What happened to all the happy space cadets believing in flying saucers and LGM? Now it's mostly darkly paranoid conspiracy mongering from nasty threatening crazies!"

    Black triangles haunting the sky, death-warmed-over greys sucking the very stuff of life out of their lifelong hosts! What an insane page in the history of the delusion that was.

    And even in the days of monochrome bulletin boards there was already the Crackpot Index. (I found a much earlier Rand Corp version from 1962!)

    Anybody remember Psychoceramics or Donna Kossy's Kooks Museum?

    Soon after there was Scott Laroche's hilarious skeptical site and his Woo Woo Credo.

    Then there was the invaluable Crank Dot Net and Jim Lippard's skeptics site.

    British-Canadian nuclear physicist Royston Paynter's "UFO" Skeptics site was a treasure. It included "Stupid Ufoologists' Tricks," "The Flying Saucer Myth," and lessons in logic!

    And the wonderful "Skeptimus Maximus" and his debunker dot com then and now is a supernova of intelligence and rationality.

    I still refer to Russell Turpin's excellent "Quacks" page.

    Oh, let's not forget Saucer Smear, the direct ancestor of these newfangled blogs. Jim didn't compute, he said. (g)

    All these websites either partly or in total address the problem of cranks, crackpots, kooks, loons, nutters and just plain crazies on the Internet in general or the "UFO" myth particularly. All were and are influential mainstays and are highly recommended.

    All in their way offered great lessons in the fine art of baloney detection, a talent essential to survival in this topic.

    "I think these people are very good at what they do, but I think that what they do is baloney!" --Leon Jaroff on Larry King

    By Blogger zoamchomsky, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • Zoam:

    Did you read chapter 12 of Carl Sagan's "The Demon Haunted World"? It is called THE FINE ART OF BALONEY DETECTION. Should be very much to your liking!

    By Blogger cda, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • It's all over...excepts for the refunds...

    By Blogger Nick Redfern, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • "The rage has subsided?"

    That there was psychotic rage over this fiasco at all tells us that some people out there take the subject much too seriously.

    And I'm guessing that the enraged emailer tried to point the finger at RR for allowing Tony B to promote interest in the busted "Roswell slides" story on a (gasp) "UFO" blog.

    The mind boggles....

    Well, la di da! What sort of utterly credulous eager believer didn't have sense enough to be skeptical of the entire cock-and -bull story and its extremely tenuous Roswell connection from the get-go?

    And AS IF there's even one smidgen of truth in the Roswell myth or in all of the flying-saucer myth to start.

    "Believing in nonsense is a dangerous thing" isn't merely a witty skeptic's signature line, it's really true!

    Some contrarians who believe a lot of stupid stuff need to bump up against hard reality, they need to be educated. And some fantasy-prone individuals will be educated only by the school of hard knocks.

    As simple as it sounds and is, it's called the "Reality Principle" in psychoanalysis: The live creature will conform to the demands of its environment in order to satisfy its needs.

    (That's Freud, but could easily be Marx or Darwin.(g))

    The enraged emailer should be thanking you RR for a lesson learned. False beliefs about the world can be corrected. You're a generous fellow, Rich, and you telling him to seek counseling may be exactly what he needs.

    But belief in the "UFO" myth is a strong delusion, and otherwise normal people manage to compartmentalize and blind themselves to its fundamental opposition to reality.

    By Blogger zoamchomsky, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • I have, Chris, thank you! And my copy of TDHW is always close.

    The "Baloney Detection Kit" part of that chapter appears on the Internet nearly 35,000 times according to Google.

    TDHW is Sagan's seminal anti-pseudoscience and anti-antiscience work. Six chapters on the "UFO" myth alone!

    Debunking old-time pseudoscience is fairly straightforward, it's the identification and refutation of antiscience--that has become so prevalent since the arrival of the Internet--that is more difficult. We've seen it on this blog. I give any expression of it my special attention. (g)

    His chapter "Antiscience" shoves the blade of reason to the hilt into tricksters selling stupid new-age spiritualism, medical quackery, quantum mysticism, creation science, fascism, flying-saucer cults and religions, conspiracy theories and any sort of pseudoscience that promotes itself by attacking established knowledge of the world provided by the scientific method and scientists.

    It's cultural brainwashing that displaces good sense and certainty with stupidity, misconceptions and mysticism. Antiscience substitutes knowledge of the world with "feel good but know nothing" bullsh!t--disabling the minds of citizens in a society that depends on them; and they are left zombie-like without the mental tools needed to escape!

    What could be more dangerous (and useless) than believing one creates his own reality, and that the world is all one big lie?

    Which takes us back to RR's deranged emailer, an unhappy camper at odds with reality.

    Sagan was a real thinker and good writer, among all of his other accomplishments.

    And if go over to RR's youtube page you can see him ponder the "UFO" puzzle and wonder aloud almost with melancholy how he still wishes it was all true but there's just no compelling evidence that it is; and that's all that counts. "Too bad." (g)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LPDTYg3Iu0

    By Blogger zoamchomsky, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • zoamchomsky said:

    'That there was psychotic rage over this fiasco at all tells us that some people out there take the subject much too seriously...

    Well, la di da! What sort of utterly credulous eager believer didn't have sense enough to be skeptical of the entire cock-and -bull story and its extremely tenuous Roswell connection from the get-go?

    And AS IF there's even one smidgen of truth in the Roswell myth or in all of the flying-saucer myth to start...

    Some contrarians who believe a lot of stupid stuff need to bump up against hard reality, they need to be educated. And some fantasy-prone individuals will be educated only by the school of hard knocks...

    But belief in the "UFO" myth is a strong delusion, and otherwise normal people manage to compartmentalize and blind themselves to its fundamental opposition to reality.'

    There's much sense in the first sentence quoted here.

    However, 'fiasco' is the sort of word that a person in a 'psychotic rage' would use - stupid, unreasoning exaggeration.

    I see it as more a case of people with a narrow view of the situation taking the thing much too seriously.

    Yes, the connection with 'Roswell' was very tenuous and I was sceptical of the entire story (but, not so much, now).

    I went to a British (Authoritarian) Public School, as a child. There were a lot of "hard knocks" there.

    The last quoted sentence again contains much truth. However, if you've seen a variety of so-called "UFOs", as I have, then "UFO" is not a "myth".

    By Blogger Daniel Transit, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • zoamchomsky said:

    "What could be more dangerous (and useless) than believing one creates his own reality, and that the world is all one big lie?"

    For a very long time now there seems to have been an unspoken agreement in the field of Ufology between the purveyors and consumers of UFO lore. If the unspoken agreement were to be verbalized, I think it would go something like this "if you tell me an interesting story and I like it, then I'll buy what you're selling and I won't ask for proof". As a well-known late-night coast-to-coast talk show host has commented in the past (paraphrasing here) 'if your story is interesting and intriguing, it doesn't matter if it's true'.

    I think this says a lot about what has recently transpired with the Slides fiasco(yes, that's the right word). The promoters of the event seemed to be relying on this unspoken agreement that no one would dare challenge their outlandish claims. It's fairly evident from the reaction of the promoters that they are totally oblivious to the power of Internet crowd-sourcing.

    It was very refreshing to watch how fast this particular outlandish claim was debunked. More, please.

    By Blogger Dennis Pharr, at Friday, May 22, 2015  

  • > David Rudiak called for UFO-blog commenters to use their real names

    It's kind of silly. Will Rudiak require that we show our papers for his personal inspection? Will Rudiak decide if our screen name sounds "real" enough? Etc.

    When pressed by me, Rudiak admitted that he would give Isaac Koi an exemption to the Rudiak Rule. Which shows the Rudiak Rule has only one purpose: to ban people Rudiak doesn't like.

    > Anybody remember Psychoceramics or Donna Kossy's Kooks Museum?

    Many years ago, before I had any UFO books, I was working in an alternative bookstore that stocked her first "Kooks" book. The chapter on the Nation of Islam and how it received revelations from spaceships blew my mind!

    By Blogger Terry the Censor, at Saturday, May 23, 2015  

  • What rage, Rich?

    This case is a "school case" for the SPH and Human Sciences as already adressing the UFO-phenomenom and potentialy explaining it!

    We have all "ingredients" of the UFO-phenomenon as a modern myth and mass delusion at play here from "Argument from authority" by Richard Doble and the sad guy Zalce Benitez (and the other "experts") to "wy people believe weird things", how Roswell mythtellers/makers have made projective elaborations from simple slide of a mummy (including Bragalia who will, I'm sure, try to become "clean" in few time), as "the public deceved".

    All is summerized in this case. Merci "BeWithness" [of a modern myth, mass delusion, called Roswell].

    It's a "school case" imho, very usefull for Human Sciences and the SPH ;)

    ++ and more to come!

    Gilles.

    PS: http://skepticversustheflyingsaucers.blogspot.fr/2015/05/la-saga-des-diapositives-de-roswell.html

    By Blogger Gilles Fernandez, at Monday, May 25, 2015  

  • Careful, Gilles, being constantly and consistently brilliant on these cases and the subject generally will get you the unwarranted and unwanted attention of self-appointed Internet policemen, who don't really understand skepticism, and lunatics, who talk a lot about "science" but ignore the fact that there is absolutely ZERO evidence for any kind of "UFO" phenomenon. And their belief blinds them to the fact that this vary same data is real evidence of a myth and social delusion in the form of false beliefs and people telling utterly inconsequential spook stories.

    By Blogger zoamchomsky, at Thursday, May 28, 2015  

  • > self-appointed Internet policemen

    Just to be clear, I am not a self-appointed Internet policeman, I am a self-appointed Internet judge.

    I tried to be a self-appointed Internet CEO, but apparently it doesn't work that way.

    By Blogger Terry the Censor, at Thursday, May 28, 2015  

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