UFO Conjecture(s)

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Alien “Ants” pilot UFOs?

I didn’t catch the “ant” comments at Kevin Randle’s blog after the May 5th debacle, so this has nothing to do with that I hope.

Myrmecology has always fascinated me, and the two books pictured here have been instrumental in maintaining that interest.
But a week or so ago, while I was sitting on the back balcony of our office, I noticed that holding something in front of ants walking the balcony, or swiping them off, caused a serious, rather immediate diminution – actual halt – in ants roaming the balcony and deck, for a prolonged period of time.

It seemed to me that the blocked or swept ants had communicated with their colony of ants, letting them know that something was blocking or stopping them from roaming the balcony area.

As you can see from this photo, the balcony is high off the ground and about half an acre away from our ground’s ant hills (colonies) which exist at the far sides of the office and in the front grassy area.
This means, to me, that the ants had “telepathically” communicated my barriers to their ant societies. (There were several species of ants involved.)

Wilhelm Goetsch in his book (The Ants, above) tells how he experimented with ants’ intelligence (mental faculties) and communication [Page 98 ff.] which he posits come from their sense of smell via their antennae.

He varnished antennae and mixed various species, which evinced a distrust of intermingled species. Using scents from each he tried various scenarios, noting that when the scents of one species was lathered on another species, things were rather fine but as the scent wore off, the ants “engaged in the wildest battle.” [Page 99]

He also noted how ants tried to escape from a concocted nest, but always tried to return to that nest foregoing their seeming desire to escape and be free, subject to their desire to work and construct more territory. [Page 123 ff.]

Rémy Chauvin, in his book (The World of Ants: A Science-Fiction Universe), deals with brain sizes and the senses of ants and other insects. [Page 163 ff.]

Chauvin provides various experiments, of elaborate kinds, showing that ants transmit sounds and messages and work their way through mazes with alacrity and skill, the behaviour of the ant [resembling] that of the ‘maze machines’, crude robots constructed about 1930, before the cybernetics era.” [Page 181].

(Chauvin also presented the similarities of ant behavior to that of bees, which were suggested by Gerald Heard, in The Riddle of the Flying Saucers, as the pilots of the flying disks reported in the 1950s, and noted at Kevin Randle’s blog by CDA but dismissed by Mr. Randle, who prefers the nonsense of Roswell to the idea that an insect species on another planet might have evolved to the point of intergalactic travel.)

Okay, I’ve gone a bit too far into the possible “thinking” of ants, whether it stems from instinct or actual thought.

But, in my observations of the ants at our office, I can’t discard the feeling that the ants were, somehow, communicating that they were being blocked or swept away by something, and got that message to the colony mates, which, by their measurement, quite out of the range of smell or sensory output.

The ants got messages to their colony instantaneously, halting the activity of roaming for periods of hours, only resuming, somewhat, after a duration that indicates to me that the ants became cautious or warned by way of thought transmission.

So let me consider that an alien society, an extraterrestrial culture/society, while not insect-like itself necessarily, might have been able to determine the ability of their planets insects to transmit thought over long distances, via the quantum models of Bell’s Theorem.

They could, this alien society, have inserted their insects “DNA” into members of their society or constructed automatons, using algorithms derived from the “minds” of their “ants” or other viable insects with the ability to transmit thought, telepathically.

This extraterrestrial society would then send out scouts to scour their galaxy or the Universe itself, much in the way that Earth’s ant colonies (or bee colonies!) do.

The automatons or “re-engineered” alien beings could be flying what have been reported  as flying saucers or UFOs since before mankind awakened from its primitive sleep.

I thought my hesitation to accept alien infestations (by way of UFO or space vehicles) because of the plentitude of “things” seen over the years would prevent me from allowing extraterrestrial visitation.

But seeing how a colony of ants (or bees) send forth its members in mass, one can envisage an alien society doing likewise.

The ant brain is more than instinct it seems to me and, thus, I can see an advanced insect society, or one attuned to insect proclivities, as possible pilots of UFOs.

RR

27 Comments:

  • Most ants are smarter than half the students I had.

    By Blogger Dominick, at Thursday, July 23, 2015  

  • And smarter than most of my Facebook friends.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Thursday, July 23, 2015  

  • Hmmm, have any of your students or Facebook friends done this?
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=prjhQcqiGQc

    By Blogger Daniel Hurd, at Thursday, July 23, 2015  

  • Ants release a chemical alert for other ants, when they sense danger.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • That chemical alert, P, would have to travel fast and far, in this instance to be effective, their colonies at the extremes of our lots(s).

    The ants stopped roaming immediately, as I noted.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • Parakletos has it, presumably the ants that were about to enter the path of you sweep-off sensed "bridge out" and told their following buddies by pheromone release to turn around and halted the traffic. Chemistry based communication.

    By Blogger Bryan Daum, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • Bryan, let me try to be clearer....

    There were a few ants using the balcony. I swept them off or blocked them.

    Once I did that, no other ants came forth, from their colonies, far from the balcony as shown in my photo of it.

    The ant parade stopped immediately, and there was no way the swept or blocked ants could have gotten back to their colonies, and none of their fellows were in the pipeline to catch a chemical whiff or anything else (vibratory movements, et cetera).

    There were no ants to "turn around."

    It, from observation and timing, showed me that the colony ants were warned, but by something other than smell or "pheremones."

    You fellows might try an experiment at your places to see what I'm trying to convey.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • RR

    Having owned a pest control company for 30 years I can only say that you just didn't catch the turn around ants or the ones you swept off somehow intercepted the would be followers.

    If only a sweep off was possible the industry would be all over it -or out of business in ant control. Its all about the scent trails one way or another.

    Think Occam's Razor.

    BD

    By Blogger Bryan Daum, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • Oh, and sweeping may have screwed up their scent trail.

    BD

    By Blogger Bryan Daum, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • Bryan:

    By writing swept, I was indicating I flicked them off the railing, and by doing that, the trail, from one side of the balcony to where I was sitting, wouldn't have been compromised.

    Moreover, I used a cane (my support lately for a bad back) to block the little creatures, by laying it in front of them.

    I assure you that the ants stopped flowing (or coming) when blocked or flicked.

    Now you may have been dealing with some ants infused by instinct or affected by scent, but the ants here are using "telepathy."

    Also, how could you decimate these fine, little, intelligent creatures? They are a mini-society to behold.

    And when their galactic brotherhood shows up, pest control companies are sure to get a comeuppance.

    I hope you're retired.

    Rich

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, July 24, 2015  

  • There was a similar case regarding dogs knowing when their owners were on their way home. Scientists traced that to smell too -- namely that the dog associated the diminished level of the owner's scent with the likely return of the owner.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Yes, P, scent play a part, maybe a big part, but a showing on National Geographic today [7/26] and what I observed indicates there's more to it than just scent.

    No thinking creature uses just one way to communicate.

    Ants are a spectacular insect/creature.

    That they may have developed or have been used to develop a method to traverse the Universe or galaxy with communicative integrity is my point.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • `` Scientists have known for decades that ants use a variety of small chemicals known as pheromones to communicate. Perhaps the most classic example is the trail of pheromones the insects place as they walk. Those behind them follow this trail, leading to long lines of ants marching one by one. However, the insects also use pheromones to identify which nest an ant is from and its social status in that nest. Because this chemical communication is so prevalent and complex, researchers long believed that this was the primary way ants shared information.

    However, several years ago, researchers began to notice that adults in some ant genuses, such as Myrmica, which contains more than 200 diverse species found across Europe and Asia, made noise. These types of ants have a specialized spike along their abdomen that they stroke with one of their hind legs, similar to dragging the teeth of a comb along the edge of a table. Preliminary studies seemed to indicate that this noise served primarily as an emergency beacon, allowing the ants to shout for help when being threatened by a predator. ``

    http://news.sciencemag.org/2013/02/shhh-ants-are-talking

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Yes, the National Geographic program updated what science knows about ants and there's much more to communication and societal behavior than scent or pheromones.

    The creatures are fascinating.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Rich,

    Don't skim. Read the 2nd paragraph. It's not about scent/pheromones.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Yes, I read it.

    The National Geographic show today had a lengthy segment on the sounds the ants made and even played those sounds.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • So even with smell and sound waves available as explanations, you still defer to 'telepathy'? Hmmm...

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Yes I do, because of the distance and timing involved in my observations.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • I think you may have tentatively ruled out smell, but certainly not sound.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • For God's sake P, the sound would have to have been stentorian to make it to the colonies on our property.

    You're thinking is slipshod here, not reading what I wrote or examining the photo of where this took place.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • My thinking is not slipshod. I know you didn't correct for the speed of sound. I am not prepared to abandon science and partake of the supernatural just because you had an experience with some ants. And I included that example of the dog knowing when his owner returns for a reason. Some people have personalities that WANT such ESP to exist. And they tend to error on the side of BELIEF in MAGIC due to those personalities. It appears that we differ in this regard.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • I suggest you catch to the rest of the house and read my latest posting about Jerry Clark's theoretical musings.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • ``Slone used this assay to identify the compounds that trigger one OR on each of the ant species. He found that an aromatic compound found in anise triggered the OR from the jumping ant that he tested. The receptors were found in both males and workers. Since studies have shown that anise oil has a repellant and/or insecticidal effect on some species of insects, the compound may be a general insect repellent that this OR is designed to detect, Slone speculates.``

    http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2012/09/ants-have-an-exceptionally-high-def-sense-of-smell/


    It seems to me unlikely that the smell would carry that distance. But it is not unthinkable that another naturally occurring odor similar to anise may have carried across your property COINCIDENTALLY. That would make far more sense and is far more likely to be true than any ANT TELEPATHY. You didn't exactly have the makings of a controlled experiment on your hands.

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • It's a conjecture based upon a personal observation, not a scientific project or experiment.

    Time to move on. You're expending too much energy on the thing.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • Mind you, I type upwards of 120 WPM on a familiar keyboard. So you may want to take that into consideration when you calculate the 'energy' I am using. Besides -- it's Sunday. If I want to poke a little fun at my friend who believes in ant telepathy, who should mind? =P

    By Blogger Parakletos, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • I don't mind.

    I'd just prefer you expend your high intelligence to topics a bit more substantive, like that posed by Clark, Randle, et al. and noted in my current posting.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, July 26, 2015  

  • "However, several years ago, researchers began to notice that adults in some ant genuses, such as Myrmica, which contains more than 200 diverse species found across Europe and Asia, made noise. These types of ants have a specialized spike along their abdomen that they stroke with one of their hind legs, similar to dragging the teeth of a comb along the edge of a table. Preliminary studies seemed to indicate that this noise served primarily as an emergency beacon, allowing the ants to shout for help when being threatened by a predator."

    Very interesting. I captured years ago pharaoh ants to eliminate them from a house and they made a very faint sizzling noise when you hear carefully.

    Regards,

    Jean

    By Blogger Rare phenomena lover, at Monday, July 27, 2015  

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