UFO Conjecture(s)

Friday, November 20, 2015

Insect Intelligence and UFOs?

A new book, Planet of the Bugs : Evolution and the Rise of Insects by Scott Richard Hall [The University of Chicago Press, 2015, Paper $17], allows consideration that UFOs may be piloted by insects, from elsewhere (another dimension or another planet system in the Universe or even Earth’s future).

Yes, many UFO buffs eschew the idea that insects may be flying around Earth in UFOs or flying saucers as Gerald Heard proposed in his 1953 book, Is another world watching!: The riddle of the flying saucers.

While Heard’s book is fraught with nonsense and error, the idea, if one absorbs the view(s) of Hall in his book, that insects could evolve to develop intelligence and the ability to create technology, is not as improbable as one might initially think.

Consideration of the ant kingdom alone forces one to speculate that insects could evolve to the point where intelligence supersedes instinct and manual dexterity is not a problem but an evolutionary development also.

The evolutionary time-line is long, 10 to 14 million years for Earth’s species.

On other planets, or later in Earth’s future, or the time in another dimension (perhaps not subject to the vicissitudes in this dimension), insects could develop in ways that mimic or transcend the way that insects have evolved here, as Scott Hall outlines.

That some UFO witnesses have seen creatures around UFOs that have an insect façade or manner should not be discounted perhaps:



Of course, the idea of an alien insect reality is delirious maybe or a product of Entomophobia.
But it (an alien insect possibility) should not be dismissed readily.

It may be a matter for discourse or debate.

RR

5 Comments:

  • The problem that may hamper this theory is the current inability to evolve away from the current physiological constraints of being encased in an exoskeleton that is very limited in increasing in size.

    I just read that certain species of wasps have a sense of numbers. A female wasp will lay her eggs in a precise cell allocating specific numbers of live caterpillars for the young hatch-lings to feed off. Five for the male larvae and 10 for the female larvae. An interesting concept for rudimentary intelligence wouldn't you think?

    Their are other pros and cons, but this is a start for you discussion.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Friday, November 20, 2015  

  • As Hall's book relates insect evolution, skeletons would, for this discussion, change, allowing, environmental or survival purposes, to transform exoskeletons into endoskeleton or hydrostatic skeletons.

    Moreover, insects from elsewhere may have developed without exoskeletons, depending on the environments in which they were born, initially.

    The limitations of Earth's insects may have nothing to do with alien insects.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, November 20, 2015  

  • "The limitations of Earth's insects may have nothing to do with alien insects."

    Yet we can only base our understanding to what is known and what we see before our eyes. So we have to base a futuristic hypothesis based on an assumption?

    What also would have to evolve is the physiological high metabolic rate that consumes enormous amounts of energy and rapid cellular death rates that lead to short lifespans. Yes, there are species that are able to "hibernate" or go into suspended animation..for lack of a better description...but these species are far and few and still have an extremely short lifespan when active.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Friday, November 20, 2015  

  • Since we're speculating on "alien insects" anything is possible, Tim.

    Hall's rundown of evolutionary changes in Earth's insects opened the door to my conjectural post.

    And I have to disagree (sorry) with your view, "Yet we can only base our understanding to what is known and what we see before our eyes."

    Nope. we don't have to base our understanding to what is known and what we can see before our eyes.

    If that were the case. most of science (gravitation, atomic structure, quantum artifacts, et cetera, et cetera) would have gotten us nowhere.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Friday, November 20, 2015  

  • "Nope. we don't have to base our understanding to what is known and what we can see before our eyes.

    If that were the case. most of science (gravitation, atomic structure, quantum artifacts, et cetera, et cetera) would have gotten us nowhere."

    Yes...you are correct, but I still see basic limitations to the insect theory, but other areas that may support it fall in the areas of developed communication concepts and social structures.

    By Blogger Tim Hebert, at Friday, November 20, 2015  

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