UFO Conjectures

Sunday, August 29, 2021

The people I (sort of) know in the UFO community and how I see them

Copyright 2021, InterAmerica, Inc.
I’m not dispossessed to comment on the people I share the internet with when it comes to the UFO phenomenon. They make up a lot of my time, on the web.
 
Let we say, for the record, here, that my persons, here, at this blog, often make my day.
 
You who are reading this are generally comprehensive with comments, generally, and always in tune with what’s going on in the UFO milieu, so let me talk about others that I run into or have known over the past few years.
 
(Many of my closest UFO friends have passed on, so allow me to work around them and their influence on me.)
 
Currently, I interact with these guys and women….
 
Nick Redfern loves to write about things strange. He just likes the idea of being journalistic about the paranormal and insidious influence of government and military intrusions into the paranormal mix.
 
José Caravaca
is absorbed by his Distortion Theory and a few exceptional UFO episodes. He has an overview of the UFO landscape.
 
Anthony Bragalia wants to leave a mark in Ufology, and resorts to finding elements within the UFO history that might help him achieve that. (His attention to Roswell has held him back from overall acknowledgment and respect from his UFO peers but he does often get notice from news media.)
 
Kevin Randle has a large following among UFO long-timers but doesn’t seem to grab UFO newbies (mostly because he is too thorough in his presentations and millennials or the younger set like instant gratification – important details are not their cup o’ tea).
 
Paul Kimball, currently a general no-show in the UFO community, sadly, is concentrating on ghost-searching, a silly past-time, as I see it,  but, although he’s a young, truly  brilliant guy, lives his life his way and to hell with those of us who miss his insights into the UFO phenomenon and the people immersed in it.
 
Issac Koi and Jan Aldrich have concentrated an d are concentrating on gathering all the past materials they can find that pertain to the UFO phenomenon, worthy as that may be, it doesn’t take us into the phenomenon on the surface of the matter,  but who knows?  Maybe the UFO truth or reality lies in the  moldering array of cobwebbed materials.
 
John Greenewald (Black Vault) provides information from the recesses of government, which confirms that entity’s interest in the phenomenon but little help in disgorging the UFO meaning or explanation. Yet, his findings validate the phenomenon.
 
Patrick Huyghe, Bill Murphy, Chris Savia and the Anomalist crew bring to us (and me) links to anomalous featured material, which allows for insights to realities that we’d normally be unaware of.
 
Curt Collins, Rich Hoffman, Beau Patrick Carrington, Cheryl Costa, Kelly Emile Gauthier, David Haith, Claude Falkstrom,  Malcolm Robinson, Nick Pope, even Philip Mantle, Johnny Summers, Robert Sheaffer, Rick Hillberg, Chris Rutkowski, Bill Chalker are most of the people I interact with on Facebook, and they offer, there, much that is worthwhile or pertinent, as I think my pal Ron Press, here, would agree.
 
And there are several UFO and paranormal groups on Facebook that sustain one’s interest (and mine) in a number of ways, supplementing knowledge that is often useful for personal edification.
 
My position, minus the genius element, about UFOs may be likened to Dr. Morbius in the sci-fi movie, Forbidden Planet:
Dr. Morbius is obsessed with the extinct culture of the planet he landed on, years ago.
 
Studying UFOs, for me, as most of you know, is about who created them and is traversing Earth: what is their culture, civilization about, their music, art,  literature, if any and the accoutrements of their existence, much as Morbius studied the Krell on the Forbidden Planet.
 
I’m inclined to be impressed by persons who want to know what UFOs and what they represent, not so much about the many started periodicals about them, or who wants to shine at a conference of UFO fanatics.
 
And those absorbed by the idea that ancient astronauts fooled around Earth in the past along with those who think people are taken from their beds or cars and played with by extraterrestrial kidnappers don’t twinge my imagination.
 
Even my interest, like Morbius’ is useless, just a curiosity that is academic more than anything, not useful from a number of standpoints that the practical among you have concerns with.
 
So, my few friends, among those who visit here and comment, make my semi-obsession with UFOs worthwhile and I’m thankful for that.
 
Life could be better, but as it is, it’s okay, despite COVID and the few jerks who occasionally intercede in my space.
 
RR

8 Comments:

  • Ghosts are more fun, more relevant, and pay better. :-)

    PK

    By Blogger Unknown, at Sunday, August 29, 2021  

  • I know but they are so very elusive, not like UFOs which are all over the place.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Sunday, August 29, 2021  

  • But are UFOs really all over the place? I don’t think so. I also don’t see anything truly new that intrigues - instead, it’s just a rehash of the same old patterns, with the same players (or new people, playing the same roles). Frankly, it’s dull.

    PK

    By Blogger Unknown, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

  • PK, my dear young friend....

    It is dull. and it is the "same old patterns, with the same players -- well there are quite a few newbies showing up on Facebook, but that's the way of things....football, the stock market, movies and TV, et cetera.

    But I have a (delayed) ghost book coming that's right up your alley. I'll make sure to note it somewhere and will send you a copy should you like one.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

  • Rich -

    I'm wondering if part of my problem isn't looking beyond the surface of cases, but my association with military intelligence over the years. People don't really understand exactly what I was doing as an intelligence officer. They have a view that is reinforced by Hollywood nonsense but I wasn't in counterintelligence. I was doing the same thing there that I do with UFOs. Try to get below the surface, but with military intelligence, if I screwed up then people could be hurt.

    I'm thinking that the younger crowd see something nefarious in military intelligence that simply isn't there... or I should say, wasn't there for my association with it. The clandestine stuff was another segment and I had no association with that.

    By Blogger KRandle, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

  • Maybe Kevin...

    But I'm finding newbies and a few old-timers not making it through a whole posting, looking for the quick answer to something that isn't quickly answered.

    If they'd read your material they would find material that they never knew before.

    RR

    By Blogger RRRGroup, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

  • I think Rich is correct in broad strokes about younger folks not really having an interest in long reads, or deep dives into data and information. I think only the fringe conspiracy nuts would see something nefarious in intelligence work (I actually see that training as an asset).

    The best part about ghosts? There is no conspiracy fringe nutter element claiming a giant government conspiracy to keep the truth from us all!

    PK

    By Blogger Unknown, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

  • Paul -

    You haven't seen the nonsense that fills my mailbox. I was even accused of having worked on Blue Book with Hector Quintanilla... By the time I was out of high school, the Condon Committee was in full swing and I was in the Army learning to fly helicopters.

    By Blogger KRandle, at Wednesday, September 01, 2021  

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